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The Theory / Spectrum styles / Inclusion Style-E

Style quick guide

Inclusion

Style E

Learning Focus

The learning focus of the Inclusion Style is to provide opportunities for continued participation of all learners in the selected task, regardless of their varied skill levels. Tasks in Style E are designed with varying levels of skill difficulty so that learners can survey the options and select an entry level of difficulty. Learners may make adjustment decisions in their task level. Additionally, learners check their performance against the prepared criteria.

*All subject matter has content that is appropriate for the different teaching styles. Physical activities were selected to more visually convey the decision making concept of each style.

The Anatomy

In the anatomy of the Inclusion Style, the role of the teacher (T) is to make all subject matter decisions, including the possible levels in the tasks, and the logistical decisions. The learner’s (L) role is to survey the available task levels, select an entry point, practice the task, make any adjustment in the task level (if necessary), and check performance against the criteria.

Pre-Impact
(planning)
(T)
Impact
(implementation)
(L)
Post Impact
(feedback and assessment)
(L)


*The arrows represent the decision shifts from the Self-Check Style-D to the Inclusion Style-E.

Style Summary

In the Inclusion Style, the teacher’s role is to make all subject matter decisions, including the various levels of difficulty in the task, the criteria sheets for each level, and the logistical decisions. The role of the learners is to survey the available levels of difficulty in the task, select an entry point, practice the task, make an adjustment in the difficulty of the task level (if necessary), and check performance against the criteria.

While the students are engaged in the task, the teacher circulates among the students to acknowledge the students’ choices and to clarify and affirm the accuracy of the students' assessment process, and/or to redirect the learner's focus to specific performance details on the criteria. The teacher does not suggest level changes.

In this style no one is excluded, and each learner is offered the opportunity for continued participation.

Subject Matter Objectives

When the Inclusion Style is achieved, the following subject matter objectives are reached:

  • To design a range of options that provide varying content entry points for all learners in the same task
  • To accommodate individual performance differences
  • To increase content acquisition by providing opportunities for continued participation
  • To offer opportunities for content adjustment decisions
  • To increase the quality of active time-on-task
  • To reinforce the assessment sequence process
  • Others

Behavior Objectives

When the Inclusion Style is achieved, the following behavioral objectives are reached:

  • To experience making a decision about an entry point into a task by choosing an initial level of performance
  • To practice self-evaluation skills using a performance criterion
  • To experience making adjustment decisions that maintain continued content participation
  • To accept the reality of individual differences in performance abilities
  • To learn to deal with congruity or discrepancy between one's aspiration and the reality of one's performance
  • To practice the skills intrinsic to self-reliance
  • To practice honesty in appropriate level selection and honesty in self-evaluation
  • Others

Related Resources and Classroom Downloads